The 2012 TIME 100 Poll

Cast your votes for the leaders, artists, innovators, icons and heroes that you think are the most influential people in the world. Official voting ends on Friday, April 6, and the poll winner will be included in the TIME 100 issue. The complete TIME 100 list will be chosen by TIME editors and revealed on TIME.com on Tuesday, April 17.

Pete Cashmore

Age: 26 Occupation: CEO, Mashable

As a 19-year-old living with his parents in his native Scotland, Cashmore became obsessed with sites like Facebook and figured, Why not me too? He promptly dropped out of school and started the innovative news site Mashable, the Internet’s go-to source for coverage of the social-media business. Now 26, he’s also the square-jawed face of the industry; under his handsome profile, @mashable has a Twitter following of nearly 3 million people.

 

http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2107952_2107953_2109576,00.html?xid=tweetbut

 

 

 

Ex-Google employee says Google+ has ruined the company

My last three months working for Google was a whirlwind of desperation,” wrote Whittaker, who headed an engineering team for social network Google+. “The Google I was passionate about was a technology company that empowered its employees to innovate. The Google I left was an advertising company with a single corporate-mandated focus.”

Whittaker, who joined Google in 2009 and left last month, described a corporate culture clearly divided into two eras: “Before Google+,” and “After.”

Google  once gave its engineers the time and resources to be creative. That experimental approach yielded several home-run hits like Chrome and Gmail. But Google fell behind in one key area: competing with Facebook. That turned into corporate priority No. 1 when Larry Page took over as the company’s CEO. “Social” became Google’s battle cry, and anything that didn’t support Google+ was viewed as a distraction.

Whittaker is not the first ex-Googler to express that line of criticism. Several high-level employees have left after complaining that the “start-up spirit” of Google has been replaced by a more mature but staid culture focused on the bottom line.

Colloboration: Importance of Engaging Employees

“Everyone’s talking about the importance of engaging employees, and the Facebook generation and collaboration tools. All of that is garbage … collaboration is a culture. It’s not a set of tools,” insists Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst.

Executives at other companies might tell human resources to go out and buy collaboration tools, but unless the company has the structure in place to let employees honestly talk to each other and the bosses, the tools won’t help.

You can’t buy your way to collaboration. If employees are not already working that way, tools become nothing more than a high-tech version of the never-used suggestion box.

Red Hat is just about to become the first and only open source company to post $1 billion in annual revenue and because of its open source roots, everything about the company is one giant collaboration.