12 great free online courses

Here by find 12 courses you could take for a completely free TED degree in Big Ideas.

The Course: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
The School: Stanford, via YouTube
Taught By: Peter Norvig, Sebastian Thrun
Course Description: Artificial Intelligence is the science of making computer software that reasons about the world around it. Humanoid robots, Google Goggles, self-driving cars, even software that suggests music you might like to hear are all examples of AI. In this class, you will learn how to create this software from two of the leaders in the field.
Notes: When Thrun and Norvig first put this course online in the fall of 2011, 160,000 students from 209 countries enrolled. While the course is closed, you can still watch the lectures on YouTube. And see Norvig discuss what he learned teaching the course in the TEDTalk, “The 100,000 student classroom.”

The Course: The Structure of English Words
The School: Stanford, via iTunes
Taught By: Will Leben
Course Description: Thanks to historical, cultural, and linguistic factors, English has by far the world’s largest vocabulary—leading many of us to have greater than average difficulty with words, and some of us to have greater than average curiosity about words. Our historical and linguistic study will cover both erudite and everyday English, with special attention to word meaning and word use, to both rules and exceptions. Most words originated with an image. “Reveal” = “pull back the veil,” “depend” = “hang down from.” Change is constant. “Girl” once meant “a young child of either sex;” an early synonym for “stupid” was “nice.” Are there good changes and bad ones? And who gets to decide?

The Course: Physics for Future Presidents
The School: University of California Berkeley, via YouTube
Taught By: Richard A. Muller and Bob Jacobsen
Course Description: Contains the essential physics that students need in order to understand today’s core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. From the physics of energy to climate change, and from spy technology to quantum computers, this is a look at the modern physics affecting the decisions of political leaders and CEOs and, consequently, the lives of every citizen. How practical are alternative energy sources? Can satellites really read license plates from space? What is the quantum physics behind iPods and supermarket scanners? And how much should we fear a terrorist nuke?”
Note: A complete guide is available to anyone who wants to teach the class at their university.

The Course: Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Erica James
Course Description: This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

The Course: Videogame Theory and Analysis
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Alice Robison
Course Description: This course will serve as an introduction to the interdisciplinary academic study of videogames, examining their cultural, educational, and social functions in contemporary settings. By playing, analyzing, and reading and writing about videogames, we will examine debates surrounding how they function within socially situated contexts in order to better understand games’ influence on and reflections of society.

The Course: Sets, Counting and Probability
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Paul G. Bamberg
Course Description: This online math course develops the mathematics needed to formulate and analyze probability models for idealized situations drawn from everyday life. Topics include elementary set theory, techniques for systematic counting, axioms for probability, conditional probability, discrete random variables, infinite geometric series, and random walks. Applications to card games like bridge and poker, to gambling, to sports, to election results, and to inference in fields like history and genealogy, national security, and theology.

The Course: Introduction to Aerospace Engineering and Design
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Dava Newman
Course Description: The fundamental concepts, and approaches of aerospace engineering, are highlighted through lectures on aeronautics, astronautics, and design. Active learning aerospace modules make use of information technology. Student teams are immersed in a hands-on, lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle design project, where they design, build, and fly radio-controlled LTA vehicles. The connections between theory and practice are realized in the design exercises.

The Course: Shakespeare After All: The Later Plays
The School: Harvard
Taught By: Marjorie Garber
Course Description: This free online Shakespeare course focuses on Shakespeare’s later plays beginning with Measure for Measure and ending with The Tempest. This course takes note of key themes, issues, and interpretations of the plays, focusing on questions of genre, gender, politics, family relations, silence and speech, and cultural power from both above and below (royalty, nobility, and the court; clowns and fools).

The Course: Securing Digital Democracy
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: J. Alex Halderman
Course Description: Computer technology has transformed how we participate in democracy. The way we cast our votes, the way our votes are counted, and the way we choose who will lead are increasingly controlled by invisible computer software. Most U.S. states have adopted electronic voting, and countries around the world are starting to collect votes over the Internet. However, computerized voting raises startling security risks that are only beginning to be understood outside the research lab, from voting machine viruses that can silently change votes to the possibility that hackers in foreign countries could steal an election. This course will provide the technical background and public policy foundation that 21st century citizens need to understand the electronic voting debate. You’ll come away from this course understanding why you can be confident your own vote will count — or why you should reasonably be skeptical.

The Course: Galaxies and Cosmology
The School: California Institute of Technology, via Coursera
Taught By: S. George Djorgovski
Course Description: This class is an introduction to the modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, i.e., the part of astrophysics that deals with the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. It will cover the subjects including: relativistic cosmological models and their parameters, extragalactic distance scale, cosmological tests, composition of the universe, dark matter, and dark energy; the hot big bang, cosmic nucleosynthesis, recombination, and cosmic microwave background; formation and evolution of structure in the universe; galaxy clusters, large-scale structure and its evolution; galaxies, their properties and fundamental correlations; formation and evolution of galaxies; star formation history of the universe; quasars and other active galactic nuclei, and their evolution; structure and evolution of the intergalactic medium; diffuse extragalactic backgrounds; the first stars, galaxies, and the reionization era.

The Course: Fantasy and Science Fiction: The Human Mind, Our Modern World
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: Eric Rabkin
Course Description: Fantasy is a key term both in psychology and in the art and artifice of humanity. The things we make, including our stories, reflect, serve, and often shape our needs and desires. We see this everywhere from fairy tale to kiddie lit to myth; from “Cinderella” to Alice in Wonderland to Superman; from building a fort as a child to building ideal, planned cities as whole societies. Fantasy in ways both entertaining and practical serves our persistent needs and desires and illuminates the human mind. Fantasy expresses itself in many ways, from the comfort we feel in the godlike powers of a fairy godmother to the seductive unease we feel confronting Dracula. This course will explore Fantasy in general and Science Fiction in specific both as art and as insights into ourselves and our world.

The Course: Bits: The Computer Science of Digital Information
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Harry R. Lewis
Course Description: This course focuses on information as quantity, resource, and property. We study the application of quantitative methods to understanding how information technologies inform issues of public policy, regulation, and law. How are music, images, and telephone conversations represented digitally, and how are they moved reliably from place to place through wires, glass fibers, and the air? Who owns information, who owns software, what forms of regulation and law restrict the communication and use of information, and does it matter? How can personal privacy be protected at the same time that society benefits from communicated or shared information?

Market Research Mobile World Asia Pasific 29-31 January 2013, Kuala Lumpur

I am honored to share this event since I am one of the official blogger of MRMW- Market Research Mobile World Asia Pasific 2013. If you follow MMA which is the premier global non-profit trade association representing all players in the mobile marketing value chain, you may hear about Market Research Mobile World too.

Mobile has a strategic position in our lives. To take a deeper look at mobile market in Asia, lets check how MRMW explains:

Smartphone adoption and usage continues to soar in Asia. According to the recent Mobile Planet study (2012), smartphones are becoming increasingly indispensable to Asian consumers. 54% of smartphone owners from China would rather give up their TV than a smartphone. In Japan 100% of smartphone owners use their mobile device to research products or services. These mobile trends provide businesses with an exceptional opportunity to rethink how to reach the new mobile consumers, interact with them and generate insights for marketing, branding and new product development.

The Market Research in the Mobile World will be an exciting and impactful event comprising of presentations from distinguished experts around the world and wide-ranging contributions on the current state-of-the-art and the future of mobile insight generation in Asia-Pacific markets.

Would you buy Google Tablet?

Google is going to sell a 7-inch tablet for $200 in an attempt to take down the Kindle Fire as the second most popular tablet after the iPad.

Gizmodo Australia viewed a training document on the tablet and scooped up all the big details.

Here are the key points:
It will be called the “Nexus 7.”
It will have 1 GB of RAM.
It comes in 8 GB model for $199, and 16 GB for $250.
It’s built by Asus.
It supports Google Wallet, and NFC.
9 hours battery life.

Russia on Rise: DLD comes to Moscow

Market leaders Mail.ru, Vkontakte and Yandex, together with a further 40 speakers and 400 guests, will debate Russia’s digital future at the digital conference, DLD Moscow, taking place from 27-29 May 2012, and is being held in the Russian metropolis for the first time. Russia is one of the fastest growing and leading European digital markets, as demonstrated by the user numbers and the capitalisation of internet giants such as :

Mail.ru, Vkontakte and Yandex. Among the 40 speakers will be Dmitry Grishin (CEO, Mail.Ru Group), Pavel Durov (CEO, Vkontakte) and Arkady Volozh (CEO, Yandex), Other speakers (a selection) include: Paul-Bernhard Kallen (CEO, Hubert Burda Media), Yossi Vardi (DLD Chairman, Israeli Entrepreneur and Investor),Viktor Vekselberg (President, Skolkovo Foundation), Maelle Gavet (CEO, Ozon), Alexander Galitsky (Managing Partner, Almaz-Cisco Fund), Cindy Padnos (Founder, Illuminate Ventures), Gene Sokolov (Head of Russia, Badoo), Eric Hazan (Partner, McKinsey & Company), Oskar Hartmann (CEO, KupiVIP), Svetlana Mironyuk (Editor-in-Chief of RIA Novosti) and Ludwig Siegele (Deputy International Editor, Economist). 

The first DLD Moscow conference will take place in the “Digital October Center” at the heart of Moscow. The even will be hosted by The Skolkovo Foundation, which has played an essential part in bringing digital innovation to the country. DLD is the international conference and innovation platform of Hubert Burda Media. DLD Media organises Europe’s leading digital conference DLD, the women’s conference DLDwomen as well as international network events in places like Palo Alto, New York, London, Tel Aviv, Rio de Janeiro and Beijing. DLD produces media publications, online and video formats as well as studies on the content of the various conferences. It also advises DLD partner companies, start-ups, investors and institutions. Its managing directors are Stephanie Czerny and Dr. Marcel Reichart, who founded the DLD Conference in 2005.

Move Over Kinect: Leap’s Motion Control Device Could Be A Game Changer

 

 

After touchscreens, gesture controlled screens is where we seem to be heading with different companies using webcams and Microsoft Kinect to ensure that the next generation laptop and computers don’t need a mouse to function. With so many devices and prototypes out there, this has to be the one that not only promises what it delivers, but could provide a viable alternative to mouse controls with its accuracy and affordability.
Leap Motion is a gesture control device that prides itself with its accuracy. Able to distinguish thumbs from fingers and handheld items like pencils, the device is able to sense specific movements so instead of having to flail your arm wildly to pick up movement, it will be able to pick up specific movements so even subtle movements are picked up. Users will also be able to create custom gestures. The development team, LEAP Motion, describe the product:

 “Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computers. It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen. For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.

This isn’t a game system that roughly maps your hand movements. The Leap technology is 200 times more accurate than anything else on the market — at any price point. Just about the size of a flash drive, the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter.”

Imagine typing away on your keyboard and only having to hover your fingers above it to select or highlight something on screen. Leap Motion offer a number of scenarios where the technology could be used such as design and gaming. The tech demo (found below) looks impressive and will be retailing at $69.99 when it’s made available. A limited number are available to pre-order for the device’s first shipment this winter.

Internet Week @NYC, Facebook, Pete Cashmore and John Battelle

After having a busy week in NYC, I just found some time to wrote about  the last trending events and sessions from Internet Week. My first impression sounds a bit disappointing. It was my first time to attend IWNY so I was expecting a bit more international event and participants. It was more local and the companies which exhibited were more based in USA. Keynote sessions were quite attaractive when I compare with panel sessions. Since the venue was not quite available for panel sessions during the exhibition, the participants had difficulty to hear and concentrate to the session.

 

I tried to join most of the sessions and some of them were quite tutorial such as ‘ How to measure content? How to go viral, video sharing and so on. For sure, none of them ( panel speakers) didnt give us any magic formula or tips which lead us to success on internet. What I wanted to share was more about the future of the Internet. I was quite impressed by John Battelle’s ( battellemedia.com)  keynote with IWNY managing director. He directly said that, Facebook is not the future of Internet. He claimed that future of internet shouldnt be driven by platforms, must be driven by consumers. Consumers should have right to choose whatever they would  like to see in their wall ( social ads, display ads..etc) On the other hand, he also claimed that, companies are no longer interested with Facebook ads. Most of the companies think that it doesnt bring ROI and they cant reach their targeted consumers on Facebook. The new generation do not prefer to see social ads on their wall. They would like to have everything for free. So, this sound a new risk for Facebook revenues.

Consequently, with the high drop of Facebook shares after second day on New York Stock Exchange, it is clear that Facebook will dominate and lead social networking sites with the number of 900 million users. The question is how Facebook marketing will help companies to grow more together? Lets see together..Stay tuned!

 

How Tech Is Changing College Life [INFOGRAPHIC]

College students today are more tech savvy than ever before. Just how important is technology to their academic lives?

More than 90% use email to communicate with professors and 73% say they cannot study without technology. Seven in 10 take notes on keyboards instead of paper, virtually all students who own an ereader read textbooks on it and most use digital tools when preparing a presentation.

All that tech has caused something of a dependency too — 38% of students can’t go more than 10 minutes without checking their smartphone or other device. All told, students spent $13 billion on electronics in 2009.

Community college students are less digitally connected than students at four-year schools, but more and more people are making the Internet their education gateway. Twelve million students take at least one class online today — in five years, that number is projected to exceed 22 million. By 2014, analysts say, more than 3.5 million students will take all of their classes online.

 

 

Internet Week New York 2012

I will be joining Internet Week. Now in its fifth year, Internet Week New York is a festival that celebrates digital culture and is a showcase for New York City’s thriving technology industry. Internet Week New York 2012 takes place May 14-21, 2012 and passes to the event are available now.
Internet Week New York 2012 is expected to bring more than 45,000 people from around the world to nearly 250 events at the festival’s new 50,000 square foot, two-story Soho headquarters at 82 Mercer and dozens of locations throughout the city, including such hot-ticket favorites as The Webby Awards hosted by Patton Oswalt, The Webutante Ball, Girls Who Rock, and Time Inc.’s “10 NYC Startups To Watch“.

Android Suffers in Tablet Market

Tablet Competition Heats Up: Kindle Fire Captures more than Half of Android Tablet Market

10″ Tablets Have 39 Percent Higher Content Consumption Rate than 7″ Tablets

Amazon Kindle Fire Doubles its Share of Android Tablet Market in Two Months

The Kindle Fire, introduced to the market in November 2011, has seen rapid adoption among buyers of tablets. Within the Android tablet market, Kindle Fire has almost doubled its share in the past two months from 29.4 percent share in December 2011 to 54.4 percent share in February 2012, already establishing itself as the tablet by a wide margin. Samsung’s Galaxy Tab family followed with a market share of 15.4 percent in February, followed by the Motorola Xoom with 7.0 percent share. The Asus Transformer and Toshiba AT100 rounded out the top five with 6.3 percent and 5.7 percent market share, respectively.

Larger Screen Tablets See Higher Level of Content Consumption

Tablet adoption among U.S. consumers continues to climb as more devices appealing to various price and feature preferences are introduced to the market. Screen size is perhaps the most outwardly apparent differentiator between devices, with the market offering consumers a wide variety of options such as the 10″ Apple iPad, 9″ Sony S1, 7″ Amazon Kindle Fire and 5″ Dell Streak. Analysis of page view consumption by screen size found a strong positive association between screen size and content consumption. Specifically, 10″ tablets have a 39-percent higher consumption rate than 7″ tablets and a 58-percent higher rate than 5″ tablet

www.tabcomparison.com